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All Hail Kale!

Fresh Salad with Roasted Beef.By Elke Probkevitz

Kale is all the rave in healthy eating. It’s a nutritional powerhouse, great for detox and filled with cancer-fighting antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and filling fiber. So good for you and so delicious, kale can be braised, sautéed, baked, marinated, shredded and even puréed into smoothies. Add some kale to your diet and you’ll feel good from the inside out.

Kale is a leafy green vegetable in the same family as cabbage and Brussels sprouts. It can grow in cooler temperatures, which produces a sweeter kale. There are several varieties, including curly kale with ruffled leaves or Tuscan kale with dark blue-green leaves that are slightly sweeter and more delicate.

Kale is low-calorie, low-carb, and full of antioxidants and vitamins. It contains vitamin K, calcium, vitamin C, vitamin A, potassium, and lutein. Kale has more iron than beef, more calcium than milk, and 10% more vitamin C than spinach. It contains nutritional benefits that are good for the eyes, skin, bones, lowering cholesterol, weight loss, and reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer.


Smoothies. Kick off your day with a nutrition-packed smoothie with kale and fruit like apples or mixed berries. The detox properties will jump-start your digestive system for the day.

Salad. Use as your greens in salads for a healthy and hearty meal. Use baby kale or add torn kale to your other greens. You can also massage kale with olive oil and lemon juice, without cooking them, to reduce the bitterness. Add almonds, avocados, and a balsamic vinaigrette or cherry tomatoes, red onion, pine nuts, and a lemon vinaigrette. Add it to a wheat berry, lentil or faro salad, too. You can also shred the kale and make it into a slaw instead of cabbage. Add shredded carrots and bell peppers and toss with a peanut dressing.

Chips. The dish that is the most in vogue using kale is kale chips. You may have seen them sold in snack bags, but you can make them at home. They are a delicious crispy alternative to potato chips. Add any combination of spices or ingredients to flavor your chips: Parmesan, Cajun spice, cinnamon and sugar, you name it!

Soup. Added into any kind of soup, it will make it more filling from all the fiber. Kale and white bean soup, sausage and kale soup, sweet potato, or butternut squash kale soup are all great options.

Pesto. Kale is great made into a pesto instead of or added to fresh herbs. Top the pesto onto pasta or use as a dressing for veggies or proteins.

Sautéed. Great hearty side dish that complements chicken or fish. Quickly sauté kale with olive oil, fresh garlic, and some crushed red pepper. Splash with a little balsamic vinegar to finish it off. Or spice sautéed kale with Indian flavors like garam masala and cumin and add chickpeas to the mix. v

Baby-Kale-And-Steak Salad



1½ Tbsp. soy sauce

¼ cup coconut water

1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lime juice

1½ tsp. cider vinegar

1 Tbsp. minced shallot

1 garlic clove, sliced

½ jalapeño pepper, minced


12-oz. boneless rib-eye steak, 1” thick

1 tsp. canola oil


freshly ground pepper

1 Tbsp. butter substitute

1 clove garlic

1 sprig thyme

5 oz. baby kale

½ small red onion, thinly sliced

1 small Japanese cucumber, peeled and thinly sliced

1 tomato, cut into wedges


Combine dressing ingredients into a bowl and set aside. Rub steak all over with oil and season with salt and pepper. Heat a cast-iron or other heavy skillet over moderately high heat. Add steak and cook 2 minutes until well browned. Add butter substitute, garlic, and thyme to skillet, spooning butter substitute over steak as it melts. Flip steak and cook another 2 minutes. Remove steak to cutting board and let rest 5 minutes.

Thinly slice steak and place in large salad bowl. Add baby kale, sliced onion, cucumber, and tomato. Toss with dressing to coat.

Want to learn how to cook delicious gourmet meals right in your own kitchen? Take one-on-one cooking lessons or give a gift to an aspiring cook that you know. For more information, contact Take Home Chef personal chef services by calling 516-508-3663, writing to, or visiting

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Posted by on November 15, 2013. Filed under In This Week's Edition. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.