Breaking News

Fine Art At The Brocha Teichman Gallery

Teichman - Eliana Picking BluberriesMany of us already know the Art Studio of the Five Towns. For a decade, Brocha has taught students of every age to paint. So it’s only natural that Brocha add a fine art gallery to the premises as well.

Over the decade of teaching children and adults, Brocha has been putting in her requisite 10,000 hours of practice that is required to master a given field. Brocha has sold paintings to collectors in Israel, in Europe, and all over the U.S. Her work has been juried into prestigious exhibits and galleries. Recently, one of her paintings took the top prize at an exclusive Manhattan show. American ArtCollector magazine has profiled her work as an emerging artist.

Hanging in her gallery are paintings of all kinds: landscapes, urban scenes, street-scenes of Israel, portraits and figurative works, and occasional still-life paintings. Most artists don’t have a repertoire this vast. This versatility is unusual, but even more unusual is that her work is painted with nothing more than knives. This technique of ‘palette-knife’ painting unifies all her work with a distinctive look, which is important in a competitive art world. A Teichman painting is highly recognizable from the crowd.

What makes her work so memorable? Brocha credits her knowledge of the ‘language of color’, which follows a school of painting, today referred to as ‘colorism’, which has its roots in Russian Impressionism. Her knife-work enhances her impressionistic paintings by allowing for thick layers of paint to overlay each other. The result is a beautiful abstraction of shapes that comingle with a realistic image. Her capture of lighting gives viewers the sense that they are there within the space. Brocha explains that this ability is the result of years painting on location, from life. Understanding the temperature of sunlight is key to creating an image that evokes a moment in time that is believable, a moment that has been encapsulated for posterity.

Amazingly, all this color comes from a limited palette of reds, yellows, and blues. This is astounding, since her paintings are so vivid with distinct flecks of every possible hue. Many familiar with Brocha’s style of teaching already know this; Brocha’s students learn how to create all the colors they need with four colors plus white.

What can we expect from future work? She has recently been inspired by photos of Jews in different historical contexts. One such example is the ‘Yemenite Jeweler’. It’s a powerful, light-infused scene of an old Jewish man practicing his trade. Brocha learned that this man immigrated to Israel later in life, lived to be 105 (111 according to some), and that his family still has a jewelry business in Israel. When this painting was completed, the image crossed oceans and, eventually, the family contacted Brocha. They were thrilled to know their great-grandfather would be remembered and appreciated by many through this work of art. Says Teichman, “I hope to create a larger body of work that incorporates Jewish history more.”

The old cities in Israel never cease to inspire her. The ancient alleys and passageways, as well as the stairways, Brocha says, are a wonderful metaphor for Torah-living. “They also breathe life into people’s homes and walls. You are instinctively drawn into the painting. You visually climb the stairs or turn the corners. A wall is a barrier, nothing more than a border. But hang a painting and suddenly there is a dynamic change that occurs.”

The gallery will be open whenever Brocha is in her studio teaching and painting. Usually this means Sundays, as well as most weeknights, except for Monday. At other times, call her at 516-374-1904 or 917-562-1819 to schedule a viewing, or e-mail her through Paintings are discounted 10% through Chanukah. The Brocha Teichman Gallery is located at 48 Frost Lane in Lawrence.

Please ShareShare on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on StumbleUponPin on PinterestEmail this to someone

Jewish Content

Posted by on December 4, 2014. Filed under In This Week's Edition. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.