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Is Egypt Heading toward a Military Regime?

By Col. (ret.) Dr. Jacques Neriah
Jerusalem Issue Briefs Vol. 13, No. 13 21 May 2013

-After the jubilation that accompanied Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi’s
“victory” over the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) in August
2012, the Muslim Brotherhood and Morsi himself began signaling their
intention to turn Egypt into an Islamic state, arousing the fears of
liberals and religious minorities.

-The opposition turned hostile to the regime and began castigating it,
exploiting the newly acquired freedom of the press. Never in Egypt’s modern
history had the press enjoyed such liberties, and Morsi became the target of
satire and mockery. In addition, a new activist group emerged calling itself
the Black Bloc. Its members, who dress in black with black masks, have
declared open war against the Brotherhood.

-Today, Egypt is on the verge of chaos. Amid a sudden popular wave of
affection and longing for the Mubarak days, there is renewed talk of the
army retaking power. As Morsi’s government fails to achieve true democracy,
respect human rights, restore security, or improve economic welfare, an
increasing number of people are calling on the army to return to the
political scene as Morsi’s only possible replacement. A recent poll found 82
percent supporting such a move.

-The question that remains is to what extent Morsi will allow Egypt to drift
into anarchy and chaos before he asks the army to take the reins. The Muslim
Brotherhood waited almost eight decades to become the rulers of Egypt.
Certainly they are in no hurry to give back what the 2011 revolution gave
them almost on a silver platter.


…read more
Source: Israpundit

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Posted by on May 22, 2013. Filed under In This Week's Edition. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.