Nachum Lemkus Visits Shalhevet

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On Thursday morning, May 14, Midreshet Shalhevet heard from Nachum Lemkus, father of Dalia Lemkus. Dalia was murdered by Palestinian terrorists late last year. The students listened to the gut-wrenching story of how Dalia was at a hitchhiking station right outside of Alon Shevut when she was brutally and fatally attacked. Midreshet Shalhevet honored Dalia by learning in her memory. Shortly after her murder, the students arranged a school-wide commemoration where students spoke about Dalia and other victims of terrorist attacks. Eleventh-grader Tamar Beer recreated a painting that Dalia had drawn, intended for her future home. The painting was presented to the Lemkus family on erev Pesach by eleventh-grader Noa Eliach and her family. Mrs. Brenda Lemkus, Dalia’s mother, was overwhelmed with emotion upon receiving the painting and hearing that a girls’ school in Woodmere took such interest in their daughter Dalia and memorialized her in a positive and beautiful way.

Unfortunately, Mr. Nachum Lemkus was home at the time, so during his visit to New York this past week, he came to Shalhevet to bring the relationship full circle. The girls were touched as he shared stories about Dalia’s beautiful life. He remarked how Dalia always had a smile on her face and how upbeat and positive she was. Dalia had been involved in a terrorist attack previously, and when asked about how she continues to live in Israel in the same fashion, she replied, “I am not going to let terrorists stop me from how I am supposed to live my life.” Mr. Lemkus also shared a song that one of his friends had composed about Dalia’s life. It portrayed her interests, hobbies, and the light that she carried with her. Although Dalia did not survive this attack, her legacy will remain strong for years to come.

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