NARIMAN HOUSE / CHABAD CENTER TO REOPEN WITH EYES TO THE FUTURE

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A renovated Chabad center in Mumbai, India, which was devastated in a 2008 terrorist attack, will enable continued growth in Chabad activities in the city, which have been ongoing since the tragedy.
A renovated Chabad center in Mumbai, India, which was devastated in a 2008 terrorist attack, will enable continued growth in Chabad activities in the city, which have been ongoing since the tragedy.

25 RABBIS FROM ACROSS ASIA TO JOIN CELEBRATIONS

August 26th event at Nariman House to include the unveiling of plans for $2.5 million Jewish museum and gathering of rabbis, representing communities throughout Asia

Mumbai, India – Nariman House, the six-story home of Chabad-Lubavitch of Mumbai and what was the target of a 2008 terrorist attack that killed six people — including Chabad-Lubavitch Rabbi Gabi Holtzberg and his wife Rivky — is set to reopen on Tuesday, August 26.

Since the horrific events of 2008, Chabad-Lubavitch has continued its activities in temporary locations throughout the city, catering to the spiritual and physical needs of the local Jewish community and visitors. Today, Rabbi Yisroel Kozlovsky and his wife Chaya serve as the organization’s directors.

With the Kozlovskys and their community looking towards the future, the celebrations will include the unveiling of plans for a $2.5 million Jewish Museum that will occupy the fourth and fifth floors of the building.

“This six-story building was continuously operating until the attack,” said Rabbi Yisroel Kozlovsky. “We’re not moving into a new building; we are returning to our original building and we will be continuing and expanding all the activities that took place here.”

To commemorate this occasion, 25 Chabad-Lubavitch rabbis from across Asia, including locations such as Bangkok, Thailand, Singapore and Hong Kong will convene at the newly renovated center for the Asian regional gathering of Chabad-Lubavitch rabbis.

“I think this is really a message for the whole world,” says Rabbi Moshe Kotlarsky, vice chairman of Merkos L’Inyonei
Chinuch, the educational arm of Chabad-Lubavitch. “You can overcome challenges, even the most horrific of challenges. You can and must rebuild, and this project serves as a beacon of light and hope that evil will not prevail.”
Chabad has a permanent presence in dozens of cities throughout Asia and has seen rapid growth over the last 20 years across the continent.

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