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Prevention And Communication Are Essential To Treating Heart Disease

Like the tick . . . tick . . . tick of a time bomb, Jeffrey Novack sensed that he might be on the verge of a heart attack. With intermittent chest pains and a family history of heart disease, Mr. Novack scheduled a consultation with Eric H. Steinberg, D.O., FACP, FACC, FCCP, a board-certified clinical cardiologist affiliated with South Nassau Communities Hospital.

An angiogram confirmed what Dr. Steinberg suspected—a 98% arterial blockage that was immediately opened with a stent. Certainly, Dr. Steinberg’s experience and expertise were vital to the successful diagnosis and outcome. However, Mr. Novack says that all the time that Dr. Steinberg spent talking and explaining things to him before and after the procedure were equally as important.

Cardiovascular disease is the number-one cause of death in the United States, accounting for one in every three deaths. On average, one American dies every 40 seconds of cardiovascular disease—disorders of the heart and blood vessels. However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the age-adjusted rate of deaths attributed to heart disease is down 25.8 percent since 1999.

Whether you have or have not been treated for coronary artery disease, it’s never too late to follow the age-old advice of the late great Benjamin Franklin, who said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Dr. Steinberg strongly recommends taking the following steps to improve your heart health:

Quit smoking.

Control cholesterol; total cholesterol should be less than 200 mg/dL.

Monitor your blood pressure, which should be below 120/80 mm/Hg.

Eat foods that are low in saturated fat, cholesterol, and trans-fat (partially hydrogenated fats).

Exercise; 30 minutes of brisk walking on most days of the week is all it takes.

Watch your weight; normal body mass index (BMI) ranges from 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2.

Symptoms of a heart attack or heart disease include: pain or discomfort in the center of the chest or other areas of the upper body, including the arms, back, neck, jaw or stomach; shortness of breath; breaking out in a cold sweat; nausea; and light-headedness.

In the event that you, a loved one, or friend need expert, advanced, and potentially lifesaving heart care, you need look no further than your neighborhood. That’s where you’ll find Dr. Steinberg and South Nassau’s Center for Cardiovascular Health.

Board-certified in cardiology and nuclear cardiology, Dr. Steinberg practices at Comprehensive Cardiology of Long Island, PLLC—an affiliate of South Nassau Communities Hospital, conveniently located at 1200 West Broadway in Hewlett.

After receiving a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, an M.S. from Yeshiva University in N.Y. and a D.O. degree from Nova Southeastern University in Florida, Dr. Steinberg completed his medical residency at Long Island Jewish Medical Center and his Cardiology Fellowship at NYU. He was chief of noninvasive cardiology at the Manhattan VA Medical Center prior to entering private practice on the South Shore of Long Island 18 years ago.

Dr. Steinberg has published several peer-reviewed articles about transesophageal echo, dobutamine echo, and nuclear stress testing and has won top prizes in research competitions hosted by the American College of Physicians and American Society of Echocardiography. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, American College of Cardiology, and American College of Chest Physicians. Dr. Steinberg is also fluent in Hebrew and Yiddish.

Dr. Steinberg offers expertise in all aspects of noninvasive cardiology. Comprehensive Cardiology of Long Island, PLLC, takes pride in offering the Five Towns and surrounding areas with the latest in cardiac diagnostic technology and patient comfort. Its affiliation with South Nassau Communities Hospital ensures that patients have immediate access to the most advanced and innovative tools for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. In addition to having a full range of state-of-the-art cardiac diagnostic services, it is one of only a few Long Island centers that also offers a specialized noninvasive treatment for refractory angina, known as Enhanced External Counterpulsation (EECP).

For more information about Comprehensive Cardiology of Long Island, PLLC, and South Nassau’s Center for Cardiovascular Health, or to schedule an appointment, please call 516-887-7000. v

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Posted by on January 23, 2014. Filed under In This Week's Edition. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.