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Terrorism 101

By Yair Shamir, Foreign Policy

George Orwell wrote in his seminal tome, 1984, “The object of terrorism is terrorism … Now do you begin to understand me?”

Unfortunately, we live in a world where too many still do not understand.

After the recent terrorist attacks in Boston, there was immense incredulity when the ethnic nationality of the perpetrators was made known. The act did not make sense to many, because terror has so often been explained merely as a product of national conflict, or as a logical reaction to “oppression” or “occupation.” Even al Qaeda, we are told, is merely reacting to America’s role in the Muslim world.

Neither the United States in particular, nor the West in general, has played a significant role in the decades-long war in Chechnya. The usual talking heads were left scratching their heads — even after more evidence of the bomber’s Islamist ideology came to light.

Modern terror connected to an extremist Islamist mindset is simply something that many in the West are unable or unwilling to truly understand. Our opinion-shapers will look into every possible angle of a terrorist’s background and history to find some way to explain away, or on occasion sympathize with, the perpetrators’ motives.

We ignore terrorists’ ideology at our own peril. While their acts are inhuman, these people are human and we must hold them accountable for their actions — not treat them as a mere tool of retribution for other misdeeds. Ignoring their ideology will mean that we can never fully understand the implications behind these attacks.

We would not accept Christians meting out vengeance against Muslims for massacres and church bombings in Nigeria, or the persecution of Coptic Christians in Egypt. Why do we accept the argument that perceived Muslim persecution in one part of the world necessitates Islamist violence in another?

In reality, our Islamist enemies’ goals are aggressive by nature. Al Qaeda’s ideological underpinnings are found in the writings of Egyptian Islamist theorist Sayyid Qutb, which lauded offensive jihad, or a jihad of conquest. There is little that is reactive about this belief system – it is not aimed at defending its rights, but at conquering the world of the disbelievers.

While it may seem unbelievable to most that al Qaeda’s attacks on the United States are about toppling the American nation, this is at the core of the terrorist organization’s goals. On March 11, 2005, al-Quds al-Arabi published extracts from al Qaeda leader Saif al-Adel’s “al Qaeda’s Strategy to the Year 2020.” Written in the 1990s, this document outlines how the terrorist organization has attempted to undertake a series of steps that will bring down the United States and the West. This impossible goal is an integral aspect of radical terrorist belief system.

The perpetrators of the Boston attacks, while seemingly unconnected to a terror cell or organization, are examples of people imbued with this radical ideology. Where and how they became radicalized is an important question for the FBI or CIA. But there is one thing we already know: …read more
Source: Israpundit

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Posted by on May 3, 2013. Filed under Breaking News,In This Week's Edition,Israeli News,U.S. News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.