The business of hiring and getting hired at Jewish non-profits

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By Alina Dain Sharon/JNS.org

It has been six years since the economy crashed in 2008, and while finding employment has been a challenge, the tide may be taking a turn for the better—particularly in the non-profit sector. But where do Jewish non-profits fall within the current landscape, from the perspective of both job-seekers and employers?

Broadly speaking, employment continues to be “a buyer’s market,” says Linda Wolfe, director of career development and placement at JVS Chicago, an affiliate agency of the International Association of Jewish Vocational Services (IAJVS).

“Employers are like kids in a candy store,” she tells JNS.org. “They have their choice [among] hundreds and hundreds of candidates.”

Yet when it comes to non-profits, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) shows a clear upward trend in “industries in the Religious, Grantmaking, Civic, Professional, and Similar Organizations subsector group establishments” since about 2011.

Seasonally adjusted employment in these industries totaled 2,925,300 employees in June 2014, down from 2,964,600 in 2008. But with some fluctuation, the number of employees has been slightly rising since 2011. The unemployment rate for these industries was 4.9 percent in June 2014, up from 3.5 percent in 2008 but down from 2011.

Statistics also show that employees in these industries are earning more per hour and working fewer hours. In May 2014, employees in this sector earned about $25.90 an hour, a significant rise from $19.57 in 2008. They also worked 30.7 hours per week this May, down from 33 hours in 2008.

These findings underscore the wider growth in part-time jobs across the country. As the Wall Street Journal reported this month, while full-time jobs last plunged by 523,000 in May, part-time jobs grew by about 800,000 that month. Just 47.7 percent of adults in the U.S. are currently working full-time.

Click photo to download. Caption: The pictured graph shows that 2014 has so far seen the highest number of jobs-per-week advertised on the JewishJobs.com since the site was founded in 2001. Credit: JewishJobs.com.

Click photo to download. Caption: The pictured graph shows that 2014 has so far seen the highest number of jobs-per-week advertised on the JewishJobs.com since the site was founded in 2001. Credit: JewishJobs.com.

When it comes to Jewish non-profit jobs, the job-posting website JewishJobs.com currently lists about 800 openings. A graph created by the service shows that 2014 has so far seen the highest number of jobs-per-week advertised on the site since its inception. The number of weekly job advertisements has been on the upswing since about 2010, says Benjamin Brown, the founder and director of JewishJobs.com.

Brown founded the site in 2001 while studying towards a graduate degree in American Jewish history and looking to find a job at a Jewish organization. The site eventually became a major job searching and posting resource for the Jewish community. As such, Brown emphasizes, the …read more

Source: JNS.org

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