Washington Post Sees Hamas Missiles Moved Into Gaza Mosque During Humanitarian Ceasefire (VIDEO)

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A screenshot of a Hamas diagram, filmed as part of an IDF video from 2009's Operation Cast Lead, showing how weapons are hidden by mosques. Photo: IDF / Screenshot.

 

A screenshot of a Hamas diagram, filmed as part of an IDF video from 2009’s Operation Cast Lead, showing how weapons are hidden by mosques. Photo: IDF / Screenshot.

The Washington Post‘s correspondents covering Israel’s Operation Protective Edge in Gaza reported that during Thursday’s five-hour humanitarian ceasefire, they saw men moving rockets into a mosque, a clear violation of international rules of war.

On Friday, buried toward’s the end of The Post’s dispatch from the front, the newspaper reported what one of its correspondents saw during the break in fighting:

“During the lull, a group of men at a mosque in northern Gaza said they had returned to clean up the green glass from windows shattered in the previous day’s bombardment. But they could be seen moving small rockets into the mosque.”

The Post‘s “buried lede” was flagged by blogger Elder of Ziyon, who said, “Too bad we don’t know the name of this mosque.”

The blogger posted an IDF video from 2009′s Operation Cast Lead, “showing how Hamas hides weapons in mosques, schools and other civilian structures.”

According to international rules of military engagement, such civilian public and religious buildings are not to be used to shield weapons, but that has been a long-held Hamas tactic in Gaza.

On Thursday, UNRWA, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, on Thursday said it discovered 20 rockets hidden in a vacant school it operated in Gaza.

Watch a video on the subject below:

…read more

Source: The Algemeiner

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